Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

 TheTrans-Pacific Partnership (now the TPP-11) was originally a massive free trade agreement involving Australia, the US and ten other countries, which reduces our democratic rights while increasing the rights of global corporations. The US withdrew in 2017, and it became the TPP-11, with some changes, but most of its worst features remain.

The TPP-11 is bad for:

  • Democracy. It allows global corporations to sue governments over health, environment and public interest laws. Read more.
  • Essential services:  locks in deregulation, promotes privatisation  and prevents future governments from regulating in the public interest. Read more
  • Workers. Contains no real protection for labour rights or migrant workers, and removes labour market testing for vulnerable temporary migrant workers. Read more.
  • The environment. Lacks enforceable commitments to key international agreements, does not mention climate change and allows corporations to sue over new environmental laws. Read more.

Economists and the World Bank predicted The TPP-12 would not deliver promised jobs and growth

After six years of community campaigning, the withdrawal of the US in January 2017 meant the TPP-12 could not be implemented.

The Turnbull Government threatened to rush the TPP-12 implementing legislation through Parliament  to get approval for a dead agreement. A Senate inquiry report  said no to the  implementing legislation in February 2017. 

TPP-11 rebadged as the CPTPP in 2018

But Japan and Australia led the pushed for a  revived TPP-11 without the US. In November 2017 TPP -11 negotiators rebadged the deal as the Comprehensive Progressive TPP (CPTPP) and suspended some of its most controversial clauses, (but not ISDS). The text was tabled in Parliament on March 26, 2018, triggering a Joint Standing Committee on Treaties Inquiry. Community campaigning also resulted in a Senate Inquiry before parliament votes on the implementing legislation in September.

See brief analysis here media commentary here and our printable TPP-11 flyer here. 

For in-depth analysis and resources, including AFTINET’s submissions  to the Parliamentary Inquiries,  click here.

Updated: July 2018