Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP)  is a massive free trade agreement involving Australia and ten other Pacific Rim countries, which reduces our democratic rights while increasing the rights of global corporations. The TPP is bad for:

  • Democracy. It allows global corporations to sue governments over health, environment and public interest laws. Read more.
  • Workers. Contains no real protection for labour rights or migrant workers, and removes labour market testing for temporary migrant workers. Read more.
  • Essential services:  locks in deregulation, promotes privatisation and prevents future governments from regulating in the public interest, Read more
  • The environment. Lacks enforceable commitments to key international agreements, does not mention climate change and allows corporations to sue over new environmental laws. Read more.
  • Internet users. Locks in strong rights for copyright holders at the expense of consumers and internet users. Read more.

After six years of community campaigning, the withdrawal of the US in January 2017 meant the original TPP-12 could not proceed, but the 11 remaining governments suspended some clauses and rebadged it as the Comprenensive Progressive TPP or  TPP-11, which was signed in March 2018 and approved for ratification by the Australian Parliament in October 2018,   If six of the eleven countries ratify it before the end of 2018, it will come into force for those countries in 2019.

For in-depth analysis and resources, including AFTINET’s submissions to parliamentary inquiries, click here. 

Updated October  2018

TPP-11 still not agreed ahead of APEC deadline next week

November 2, 2017: Media reports from the secret TPP–11 meeting held in Japan this week show that there is still no agreement between the 11 governments about the possible content of the TPP agreement without the US. They were aiming to reach agreement before a TPP -11 Ministers’ meeting on November 8-9, ahead of the APEC meeting in Vietnam on November 10.

New paper explains TPP's impact on access to medicines in member countries

November 2, 2017: A new research paper, co-authored by public health experts Deborah Gleeson, Joel Lexchin, Ruth Lopert and Burcu Kilic, explains the impact that the intellectual property chapter of the original Trans-Pacific Partnership could have on access to medicines in each of the TPP countries. As the TPP-11 meet this week to attempt to revive the TPP without the US, the research findings show how damaging the original medicine proposals would be.

Philippines thinks TPP not 'too hot' without US and won't join

October 17, 2017: The Finance Secretary of the Philippines, Carlos Dominguez, has stated that the Philippines will not join the TPP without the US. The US withdrew from the TPP agreement on January 24, 2017. Manila Bulletin reports that Mr Dominguez recently told a leaders' forum in Washington DC, “Without the US I don’t think it’s going to be too hot… Without the US, it doesn’t make sense.”

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