Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP)  is a massive free trade agreement involving Australia and ten other Pacific Rim countries, which reduces our democratic rights while increasing the rights of global corporations. The TPP is bad for:

  • Democracy. It allows global corporations to sue governments over health, environment and public interest laws. Read more.
  • Workers. Contains no real protection for labour rights or migrant workers, and removes labour market testing for temporary migrant workers. Read more.
  • Essential services:  locks in deregulation, promotes privatisation and prevents future governments from regulating in the public interest, Read more
  • The environment. Lacks enforceable commitments to key international agreements, does not mention climate change and allows corporations to sue over new environmental laws. Read more.
  • Internet users. Locks in strong rights for copyright holders at the expense of consumers and internet users. Read more.

After six years of community campaigning, the withdrawal of the US in January 2017 meant the original TPP-12 could not proceed, but the 11 remaining governments suspended some clauses and rebadged it as the Comprenensive Progressive TPP or  TPP-11, which was signed in March 2018 and approved for ratification by the Australian Parliament in October 2018,   If six of the eleven countries ratify it before the end of 2018, it will come into force for those countries in 2019.

For in-depth analysis and resources, including AFTINET’s submissions to parliamentary inquiries, click here. 

Updated October  2018

Revised TPP-11 text is largely unchanged: independent assessment and Senate Inquiry needed

Media release, February 21 2018: “The new text of the revised and rebranded Comprehensive Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership between Australia and 10 other countries without the US contains minor additional change since last November. Some other governments have demanded further changes, but the Australian government has not,” Dr Patricia Ranald, AFTINET Convener said today.

Demand a Senate Inquiry on the real costs of the re-badged TPP

The 11 remaining countries involved in the Trans-Pacific Partnership have agreed on a new text and new name to revive this failed agreement, but it is still a bad deal. They agreed  to rename the deal and to suspend some of its most controversial clauses, pending the possible US return to the agreement, and it was signed on March 8, in Chile. But it  is still a bad deal. It includes foreign investor rights to sue governments, restrictions on regulation of essential services and more vulnerable temporary workers without testing if local workers are available.  The implementing legislation will be reviewed over the next few months by a parliamentary committee on which the government has a majority. Send a message to the opposition parties and independents to demand a Senate Inquiry and independent  assessment of the real costs of the deal. 

Send a message to demand a Senate Inquiry that can assess the real costs of the re-badged TPP!

Rebranded TPP 11 deal: a mess of side deals with no detail, but ISDS and temporary migrant workers remain

Media release, 24 January 2018: “The rebranded TPP 11 outcome announced today appears to be a mess of separate deals cobbled together to meet issues raised by Canada and others, which Trade Minister Steve Ciobo has described as “18 free trade agreements” for Australia.

Greenpeace report: ISDS empowers global corporations at the expense of people and planet

January 19, 2018: A new report by Greenpeace, Justice for People and Planetuses 20 case studies of global corporations to explain how corporate power is being used to violate human rights and environmental rights. The report argues that governments should adopt 10 Principles for Corporate Accountability to curb ‘corporate capture, collusion and impunity’.

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