Trans-Pacific Partnership

Community groups reject TPPA proposals

Over 40 organisations, including church, public health, pensioner, union, environment and aid and development organisations, have endorsed a letter to the new Trade Minister Andrew Robb expressing strong opposition to proposals in the TPPA on investor rights to sue governments, access to medicines, copyright, Australian media content and food labelling and urging him to reject these proposals.

See the letter here.

Coalition policy gives manufacturing bosses a seat at trade negotiations, not farmers, unions or other groups

An obscure clause buried in the Liberal-National Coalition’s manufacturing policy says they will ‘appoint at least one industry representative who will be directly included in the negotiation of Free Trade Agreements’. The policy is on p.14 of the Coalition Manufacturing policy released last week. As it was not in the Coalition trade policy, AFTINET only became aware of it today, after we had sent out our comparison of parties’ trade policies.

This is an extraordinary and probably unworkable policy for three reasons.

Workers speak out about TPPA

The global union movement has produced a short video of workers in all of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPPA) countries discussing the impact of the free trade agreement.

Workers from around the world speak out about downward pressure on wages and labour rights, more polluted air and water, reduced access to life saving medicines, and more powerful corporations influencing our laws and trying to override our voices.

They have also created a petition targeting all the countries participating in the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Sign the petition here.

AFTINET's Convener speaks to ABC radio from Brunei

AFTINET's convener Dr Patricia Ranald spoke to ABC radio this morning from Brunei, where she is observing the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) currently under negotiation.

Dr Ranald reports on the progress of the negotiation and talks about Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) and how it could affect our health and environmental regulation, using the examples of tobacco and coal seam gas mining.

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