Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) is a massive free trade agreement involving Australia, the US and ten other countries, which reduces our democratic rights while increasing the rights of global corporations. 

The TPP is bad for:

  • Democracy. It allows global corporations to sue governments over health, environment and public interest laws. Read more.
  • Health. Medicines will be more expensive because of stronger monopoly rights for pharmaceutical companies to charge higher prices for longer. Read more.
  • Workers. Contains no real protection for labour rights or migrant workers, and removes labour market testing. Read more.
  • The environment. Lacks enforceable commitments to key international agreements, does not mention climate change and allows corporations to sue over new environmental laws. Read more.
  • Internet users. Locks in strong rights for copyright holders at the expense of consumers and internet users. Read more.

Despite all the downsides of the deal, economists and the World Bank predict few benefits for Australia. 

The Turnbull Government will try to rush the TPP’s implementing legislation through Parliament this year, to pave the way for Australia to ratify the agreement. But Labor, Greens and independent representatives could block the deal by voting against its implementing legislation in the Senate. 

For all the latest news on the TPP, follow this link.

For in-depth analysis and resources, including AFTINET’s JSCOT submission and our printable TPP flyer, click here. 

 

TPP Senate inquiry urgent in the face of even stronger medicine monopolies

***UPDATE:  A Senate inquiry was established on September 15***

12 September 2016

Sixty diverse Australian civil society organisations, representing two million Australians, have called for a Senate inquiry into the TPP before Parliament votes on the TPP’s implementing legislation. This call is now even more urgent after recent revelations that the US is pushing for even stronger monopoly rights for lifesaving biologic medicines in  the TPP.

TPP: US pressures Australia for even stronger monopolies on biologic drugs

Media Release, September 9 2016:  “We are alarmed by reports that US Senate Finance Committee Orrin Hatch says the US administration has “made progress” in talks with Australia and other TPP countries to find a way to increase data protection for costly lifesaving biologic drugs from eight years in the current TPP text to twelve years,” said Dr Patricia Ranald, Convener of the Australian Fair Trade and Investment Network.

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