Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

Points for submission to the Senate inquiry on the TPP-11: due May 31

Your submission will be most effective if it is in your own words, and related to your experience. Below are some points you can use. 

Senate Inquiry submissions close on May 31. You can send your message by email to fadt.sen@aph.gov.au

The  TPP-11 text can be found here.  AFTINET's full submission to JSCOT is available here

 

Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

The original Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP-12) was  a massive free trade agreement involving Australia, the US and ten other countries, which reduces our democratic rights while increasing the rights of global corporations.

The TPP-12 was bad for:

  • Democracy. It allows global corporations to sue governments over health, environment and public interest laws. Read more.
  • Health. Stronger monopoly rights for pharmaceutical companies to charge higher prices for longer. Read more.
  • Workers. Contains no real protection for labour rights or migrant workers, and removes labour market testing for vulnerable temporary migrant workers. Read more.
  • The environment. Lacks enforceable commitments to key international agreements, does not mention climate change and allows corporations to sue over new environmental laws. Read more.

Economists and the World Bank predicted The TPP 12 would not deliver promised jobs and growth

After six years of community campaigning, the withdrawal of the US in January 2017 meant the TPP could not be implemented.

The Turnbull Government threatened to rush the TPP’s implementing legislation through Parliament  to get approval for a dead agreement. A Senate inquiry report  said no to the  implementing legislation in February 2017. 

TPP-11 rebadged as the CPTPP in 2018

But Japan and Australia led the pushed for a  revived TPP-11 without the US. In November 2017 TPP -11 negotiators rebadged the deal as the Comprehensive Progressive TPP (CPTPP) and suspended some of its most controversial clauses, (but not ISDS). The text was tabled in Parliament on March 26, 2018, triggering a Joint Parliamentary Inquiry and possible Senate Inquiry before parliament votes on the implementing legislation. 

 See brief analysis here and media commentary here

For in-depth analysis and resources, including AFTINET’s submissions  and our printable TPP flyer, click here.

Updated: March  2018

Photos from TPP protest June 15, 2018

Over 120 people from 20 union, church, aid and environment organisations rallied outside the Sydney public hearing of the Joint Standing Committee on Treaties concerning the proposed  Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP-11). Speakers focused on the impact the TPP-11 would have on workers, temporary migrant workers and women, the cost of medicines, and the extra rights it would give investing corporations to sue the Australian government. The JSCOT and a Senate Inquiry will report back to parliament in September on whether or not the parliament should vote in favour of the legislation to implement the TPP-11. The protest movement is urging MPs to vote against the implementing legislation. See photos here.

Malaysia to reconsider TPP-11

June 12, 2018: Malaysia’s new Prime Minister, Dr Mahathir, last Friday made a brief but stunning statement in a media conference in Japan that he will review the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP-11.

Dr Mahathir said he believes weaker economies like Malaysia are at a disadvantage under the current terms, "It is important to take into consideration the level of development of a country."

Veolia loses ISDS case against Egypt – after six years and millions in costs

June 4, 2018: Veolia, the giant French corporation which operates in Australia and world-wide, has finally lost its claim against Egypt over a waste management contract dispute in which they claimed compensation for an increase in the minimum wage under a new labour law. Its claim was for €174 million (A$268 million), and was launched in 2012.

Say NO to TPP-11 on June 15

 

 

The TPP-11 has been tabled in Parliament and is being reviewed by a joint committee dominated by the government before consideration of the implementing legislation. We have succeeded in getting a Senate Inquiry on which the government does not have a majority and are campaigning for the Senate to reject the TPP-11 implementing legislation.

The government-dominated joint committee is meeting at 1 Bligh St, Sydney, on June 15.

Join us for a protest on Friday June 15
12.30-1.30 pm
Farrar Place, Sydney
opposite cnr Bent & Bligh Streets,City
(nearest station Circular Quay)

Share our Facebook event and printable flyer.

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