Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

Send the Trade Minister a message: Don't revive the zombie TPP!

The 11 remaining countries involved in the Trans-Pacific Partnership are continuing to meet in an effort to revive this failed agreement. They missed their deadline of November 11 2017, and the talks were only salvaged by an agreement to rename the deal, suspend some of its most controversial clauses and to have further talks over several months on issues raised by Canada and other governments. 

Send a message to the Australian Trade Minister Steven Ciobo telling him not to revive the zombie TPP!

Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a massive free trade agreement involving Australia, the US and ten other countries, which reduces our democratic rights while increasing the rights of global corporations.

The TPP is bad for:

  • Democracy. It allows global corporations to sue governments over health, environment and public interest laws. Read more.
  • Health. Medicines will be more expensive because of stronger monopoly rights for pharmaceutical companies to charge higher prices for longer. Read more.
  • Workers. Contains no real protection for labour rights or migrant workers, and removes labour market testing. Read more.
  • The environment. Lacks enforceable commitments to key international agreements, does not mention climate change and allows corporations to sue over new environmental laws. Read more.
  • Internet users. Locks in strong rights for copyright holders at the expense of consumers and internet users. Read more.

Despite all the downsides of the deal, economists and the World Bank predicted it would not deliver promised jobs and growth

After six years of community campaigning, the withdrawal of the US in January 2017 meant the TPP could not be implemented. the Turnbull Government threatened to rush the TPP’s implementing legislation through Parliament  to get approval for a dead agreement. A Senate inquiry report said no to the  implementing legislation, The  government has not presented the legislation, because Labor, Greens and NXT Senators  have a majority and do not support it.

For all the latest news on the TPP, including the Senate report, and attempts to revive the TPP, follow this link.

For in-depth analysis and resources, including AFTINET’s submissions and our printable TPP flyer, click here. 

Updated: February 2017

 

No TPP campaign continues

November 28, 2017: The Turnbull government is trying to revive the TPP and retain many of the worst US-initiated clauses. The TPP-11 leaders have not met their deadline to finalise the text, but at the latest round of negotiations they salvaged a possible deal. The agreement has been rebranded the 'Progressive Comprehensive TPP', and some of its most controversial clauses have been suspended, pending the US rejoining the agreement. The negotiations will continue in 2018.

TPP 11 need for further talks show flaws in the deal

Media Release November 11, 2017: “TPP 11 leaders meeting in Da Nang Vietnam have  agreed on some elements of a possible deal without the US, but have not succeeded in their aim of finalising the text. The talks have only been salvaged by an agreement to rename the deal, suspend some of its most controversial clauses and to have further talks over several months on issues raised by Canada and other governments,” AFTINET Convener Dr Patricia Ranald said today.

New study shows TPP could cost PBS hundreds of millions

November 9, 2017: new paper by leading health experts published in the Australian Health Review and summarised in Fairfax news and The Conversation has found that the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement could add up to $367 million to the cost of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme if increases in data protection monopolies for biologic medicines proposed in the original TPP text are implemented.

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