Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a massive free trade agreement involving Australia, the US and ten other countries, which reduces our democratic rights while increasing the rights of global corporations.

The TPP is bad for:

  • Democracy. It allows global corporations to sue governments over health, environment and public interest laws. Read more.
  • Health. Medicines will be more expensive because of stronger monopoly rights for pharmaceutical companies to charge higher prices for longer. Read more.
  • Workers. Contains no real protection for labour rights or migrant workers, and removes labour market testing. Read more.
  • The environment. Lacks enforceable commitments to key international agreements, does not mention climate change and allows corporations to sue over new environmental laws. Read more.
  • Internet users. Locks in strong rights for copyright holders at the expense of consumers and internet users. Read more.

Despite all the downsides of the deal, economists and the World Bank predicted it would not deliver promised jobs and growth

After six years of community campaigning, the withdrawal of the US in January 2017 meant the TPP could not be implemented. the Turnbull Government threatened to rush the TPP’s implementing legislation through Parliament  to get approval for a dead agreement. A Senate inquiry report said no to the  implementing legislation, The  government has not presented the legislation, because Labor, Greens and NXT Senators  have a majority and do not support it.

For all the latest news on the TPP, including the Senate report, follow this link.

For in-depth analysis and resources, including AFTINET’s submissions and our printable TPP flyer, click here. 

Updated: February 2017

 

Civil society protests as leaders praise flawed TPP at Chile meeting

17 March 2017: Representatives from all TPP countries except the US missed an opportunity to strive for fairer trade deals when they praised the dead TPP in a statement following a meeting in Viña del Mar, Chile.

The meeting was held on the sidelines of a broader meeting on Integration Initiatives in the Asia-Pacific region including non-TPP countries China, Korea and the US.

Missed opportunity

In praising the TPP, leaders ignored calls for fairer trade deals from civil society organisations from around the world.

Trump wants even worse medicine rules

20 February 2017: US President Trump says countries like Australia are “freeloading” because our government regulates medicine prices through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS).

The PBS is a vital part of Australia’s health system because it helps to ensure lifesaving medicines are affordable and accessible.

At a meeting with pharmaceutical companies in January, Mr Trump said:

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