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Trading away public health? Health issues in the Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade agreement

Trading away public health? Health issues in the Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade agreement

Public Meeting Thursday, September 1

Trading away public health? Health issues in the Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade agreement Thursday, September 1

The Australian government is negotiating a Trans- Pacific Partnership free trade agreement with the United States, New Zealand, Chile, Peru, Brunei, Singapore, Malaysia and Vietnam.
 

TPPA Campaign Background and SIgn On Commitment

This page has been created to provide details of the commencement of the TPPA Campaign and some background informaiton.

Campaign Sign On:

Thirty Australian unions and community groups, on Sunday 14th March 2010, asked the Trade Minister to safeguard the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, Australian local content in media, regulation of GE food, regulation of foreign investment and industry policies that support local employment in the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) negotiations started on Monday March 15.

Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

The Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) is a proposed new regional free trade agreement which builds on an existing Free Trade Agreement between New Zealand, Chile, Singapore and Brunei Darussalam. The negotiations now include the United States, Australia, Peru, Vietnam and Malaysia, with several others including Japan expressing interest in joining.

China- Australia FTA (ChAFTA) lopsided

The China-Australia FTA text  released on June 17, 2015 shows the Australian government made huge concessions on temporary labour and investor rights in its desperation to complete the deal. 

AFTINET's preliminary analysis  reveals that the Australian Government has increased temporary labour mobility and has agreed that Chinese investors will be able to sue Australian governments if they can claim that a change in law or policy "harms" their investment, known as Investor-State Disputes or ISDS, but those provisions are unfinished and ambiguous.  A Memorandum of Understanding  separate from the text of the trade agreement gives Chinese investors in projects valued over $150 million additional rights to bring in temporary migrant workers.

See the AFTINET media release on ISDS here. See Sydney Morning Herald articles by Michael West and Peter Martin,  Kyla Tienhaara in the Canberra Times  and Joanna Howe in the Conversation.

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