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Nobody wins in Trump’s trade war

June 1, 2018: President Trump last month imposed tariffs on steel and aluminium imports from China and Japan, and has now extended these to Canada, Mexico and the EU. The pretext for these actions is that the aluminium and steel industries are essential to US national security. The US now faces tariff retaliation from all of these countries, as well as legal action through the World Trade Organisation, which is not likely to accept the national security argument.

Say NO to TPP-11 on June 15

 

 

The TPP-11 has been tabled in Parliament and is being reviewed by a joint committee dominated by the government before consideration of the implementing legislation. We have succeeded in getting a Senate Inquiry on which the government does not have a majority and are campaigning for the Senate to reject the TPP-11 implementing legislation.

The government-dominated joint committee is meeting at 1 Bligh St, Sydney, on June 15.

Join us for a protest on Friday June 15
12.30-1.30 pm
Farrar Place, Sydney
opposite cnr Bent & Bligh Streets,City
(nearest station Circular Quay)

Share our Facebook event and printable flyer.

Business journalist says JSCOT report a critique of PACER-Plus

17 May 2018: Business journalist Nic Maclellan has analysed the Joint Standing Committee on Treaties (JSCT) report into the PACER-Plus trade deal on Devpolicy blog. He writes, “although the committee recommends that Parliament should ratify PACER-Plus, the report is a telling critique of the treaty’. It concedes that ‘the absence of PNG and Fiji… significantly diminishes the utility of the agreement for Australian businesses’.

Trump threatens Australia’s affordable medicines through trade deals

May 14, 2018: US President Donald Trump last Friday ordered his Trade Representative, Robert Lighthizer, to end “freeloading” and force trading partners to increase prices they pay for US pharmaceutical exports.

This policy results from the US pharmaceutical companies absurd and unproven argument that if other governments abandon their affordable medicine policies and agree to higher prices, the companies would then lower their prices in the US.

Pacific Island trade deal diminished without PNG and Fiji and could cause harm, says report

Media Release, May 9, 2014: “The Joint Standing Committee on Treaties Report on the PACER Plus trade deal between Australia New Zealand and nine Pacific Island countries admits that the absence of Papua New Guinea and Fiji ‘significantly diminishes’ the value of the deal,” AFTINET Convener Dr Patricia Ranald said today.

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