Indonesia/Australia FTA

ACTU polling reveals community opposition to trade agreements that undermine workers’ rights and government sovereignty

October 9, 2019: Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) polling in the seats of Bass, Brand, Corio, Hunter and Rankin reveals 75 - 80 per cent of voters oppose trade agreements that allow additional work visas without first testing if local workers can fill available jobs and that include Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) provisions that give corporations the right to sue governments for policy decisions that impact on their profit.

AFTINET and Indonesia for Global Justice release joint statement on the Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement

October 8, 2019: AFTINET and Indonesia for Global Justice have come together to oppose the inclusion of investor rights to sue governments in the Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement.

Indonesia trade deal faces Senate hurdles

September 26, 2019: The Canberra Times and SBS news have reported that the Australia-Indonesia trade deal could face Senate opposition after key cross benchers, including the Greens, Centre Alliance and One Nation expressed concerns about aspects of the deal, including provisions for an additional 5000 temporary seasonal fruit and vegetable pickers each year who are vulnerable to wage theft and other forms of exploitation.

Explainer - Indonesia - Australia Free Trade Agreement

Wednesday March 6, 2019: Dr Patricia Ranald's article in The Conversation explains that the new Indonesia - Australia Comprehensive Partnership Agreement has no independent assessment of costs and benefits.  There are no chapters committing both governments to United Nations standards for labour rights and the environment to prevent a race to the bottom. But it does have a chapter allowing foreign investors to sue governments if the investor can argue that a new law or policy has harmed their investment (ISDS). And it greatly increases the number of working holiday visas to be issued to Indonesian workers despite the evidence that many of these workers face grave exploitation in Australia. All of these issues contradict the new Labor Party trade policy.

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