Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP)

RCEP negotiations to continue into 2018

November 17, 2017: After five years and 20 rounds of negotiations, the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) will continue into 2018. This means that they have missed a deadline for the third time. The Leaders' statement lists 18 chapters for continued talks.

 Indonesian Minister of Trade Enggartiasto Lukita has asked negotiating countries to be ‘more realistic and flexible’ about their standards. He also has referred to the RCEP as ‘the only game in town’, an apparent reference to the uncertain future of the TPP-11.  Other reports say the new target  for completion is November 2018.

India responds to calls to resist medicine monopolies in RCEP

October 26, 2017: MSF (Doctors without Borders) has called for India and other countries to block RCEP proposals from Japan and South Korea that would allow pharmaceutical companies to have stronger monopolies, prevent competition and keep medicine prices high. They added that it was time to end the push for ever-higher levels of monopoly control of medicines through free trade agreements .

Philippines thinks TPP not 'too hot' without US and won't join

October 17, 2017: The Finance Secretary of the Philippines, Carlos Dominguez, has stated that the Philippines will not join the TPP without the US. The US withdrew from the TPP agreement on January 24, 2017. Manila Bulletin reports that Mr Dominguez recently told a leaders' forum in Washington DC, “Without the US I don’t think it’s going to be too hot… Without the US, it doesn’t make sense.”

Huge community movement challenges RCEP in Hyderabad, India

July 24, 2017: Media Alert: “The Australian Fair Trade and Investment Network strongly supports the community mobilisation taking place in India on July 24 to challenge TPP-like corporate proposals in the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership,” said AFTINET Convenor Dr Patricia Ranald today.

“Concerted campaigning by public health, trade union and environmental organisations stopped the Trans-Pacific Partnership, but the same agenda for corporate powers to sue governments and stronger monopolies on medicines and seeds is emerging in the RCEP.

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