Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP)

Is the RCEP the TPP by another name?

The TPP failed because its corporate agenda was so damaging for people and the planet that it faced overwhelming opposition worldwide. But global corporations and some governments, including the Australian government, are pushing to repeat the same failed model in other trade agreements. First in line is the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP). 

But is the RCEP just the TPP by another name? Read our explainer here.

Learn more about the key issues in the RCEP:

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Greenpeace report: ISDS empowers global corporations at the expense of people and planet

January 19, 2018: A new report by Greenpeace, Justice for People and Planetuses 20 case studies of global corporations to explain how corporate power is being used to violate human rights and environmental rights. The report argues that governments should adopt 10 Principles for Corporate Accountability to curb ‘corporate capture, collusion and impunity’.

RCEP negotiations to continue into 2018

November 17, 2017: After five years and 20 rounds of negotiations, the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) will continue into 2018. This means that they have missed a deadline for the third time. The Leaders' statement lists 18 chapters for continued talks.

 Indonesian Minister of Trade Enggartiasto Lukita has asked negotiating countries to be ‘more realistic and flexible’ about their standards. He also has referred to the RCEP as ‘the only game in town’, an apparent reference to the uncertain future of the TPP-11.  Other reports say the new target  for completion is November 2018.

India responds to calls to resist medicine monopolies in RCEP

October 26, 2017: MSF (Doctors without Borders) has called for India and other countries to block RCEP proposals from Japan and South Korea that would allow pharmaceutical companies to have stronger monopolies, prevent competition and keep medicine prices high. They added that it was time to end the push for ever-higher levels of monopoly control of medicines through free trade agreements .

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